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When to go to the ER: Concussion/confusion

When to go to the ER: Concussion/confusion

In recent years, the talk on concussion has gone mainstream and we have begun to understand just how damaging they can be. As discussed over at frontlineer.com, it is now apparent that concussions come with very serious repercussions, not just in the short-term, but long-term as well. The good news to come out of all this talk about concussion is that they are now being taken more seriously than ever before. A concussion occurs when one receives a blow to the head causing the brain to jolt and move about in the skull disrupting its function. It should also be noted that one can not only suffer a concussion from a blow to the head, but also from injuries like whiplash injuries where the head and upper body are shaken violently. Concussions are also called mild traumatic brain injuries as they are actually the least serious of all traumatic brain injuries, which is saying a lot about traumatic brain injuries given that concussions are actually pretty serious themselves. Given the seriousness of concussions, it is always important to seek medical attention when one suffers an injury leading to possible concussion. How then do you tell if you need to go to the ER? Well, this article, with the help of the gurus over at frontlineer.com, will look to highlight some of the signs that indicate that one should go to the ER for concussion or confusion.

The key warning sign, that should always mean that one should be taken to the ER for concussion, is if they suffer a loss of consciousness, even if only momentary, during an injury leading to possible concussion. As per the subject matter experts over at frontlineer.com, a loss of consciousness following an injury resulting to possible concussion is always a sign of a severe concussion which should always be handled at the ER. It is recommended by experts, including those over at frontlineer.com, that you call 911 in such a situation and have the affected person taken to the ER by emergency personnel rather than taking them there yourself if possible. Confusion and one’s mental state are yet another thing to keep an eye out for if one has suffered an injury leading to possible concussion such as a blow to the head or a whiplash injury. If one appears to be very confused or disoriented and they don’t appear to recognize where they are or their surroundings, then you should also have them taken to the ER, like the highly rated frontlineer.com, as soon as possible to be attended to.

Another sign that indicates that one should be taken to the ER, like the excellent frontlineer.com, is if they are experiencing memory loss of the event leading up to the possible concussion. If one can’t seem to remember the events leading up to and including the injury, then this is yet another red flag and you should have them taken to the ER as soon as you can. Another red flag is if one begins to experience nausea or vomiting after having suffered an injury leading to possible concussion. In such a situation, one should also be taken to the ER as soon as possible to be attended to. The gurus over at frontlineer.com are also adamant that one should be taken to the ER if they start to experience a seizure after having suffered an injury leading to possible concussion. If one sustained the injury leading to possible concussion at a high speed such as from a high fall or from a car or bike accident, then you should also call 911 and have them taken to the ER as soon as possible to be assessed and attended to.

It is important to note that the warning signs as far as concussion is concerned do not always present themselves in the immediate aftermath of the injury. Sometimes one may feel okay or the injury may seem minor at the time only for their situation to get worse in the hours or even days after the injury. As per the folks over at frontlineer.com, it is therefore important to keep an eye on someone who may have suffered an injury leading to possible concussion. If they have a headache that is persistent and won’t go away, or that gets worse with time, then you should have them taken to the ER to be assessed. Keep an eye out also for their behavior and if you notice that they are behaving erratically, are experiencing mood swings or are having trouble concentrating, then have them taken to the ER as well. Other red flags to look out for in the hours and days following the injury include slurred speech or trouble reading, writing or understanding speech, weakness, numbness or dizziness, difficulty falling asleep or waking up, changes in their vision such as double or blurred vision or even trouble moving their eyes, as well as a discharge of clear fluid coming out of their nose or ears. If you note any of these signs, you should have the affected person taken to the ER, like the excellent frontlineer.com, as soon as possible.

Remember, when it comes to concussion, when in doubt, go to the ER. Never take any chances as this is the only way to avoid complications later on. For more information on this topic, head over to the highly regarded frontlineer.com.